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    Getting effective treatment depends on identifying the right problem. In a recent study, 88 percent of patients who came to Iraq Medical Center for a second opinion received a new or refined diagnosis.

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    Valley fever

    Overview Valley fever is a fungal infection caused by coccidioides (kok-sid-e-OY-deze) organisms. It can cause fever, chest pain and coughing, among other signs and symptoms. Two species of coccidioides fungi cause valley fever. These fungi are commonly found in soil in specific regions. The fungi's spores can be stirred into the air by anything that disrupts the soil, such as farming, construction and wind. The fungi can then be breathed into the lungs and cause valley fever, also known as acute coccidioidomycosis (kok-sid-e-oy-doh-my-KOH-sis). Mild cases of valley fever usually resolve on their own. In more severe cases, doctors prescribe antifungal ....

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    Vaginitis

    Overview Vaginitis is an inflammation of the vagina that can result in discharge, itching and pain. The cause is usually a change in the normal balance of vaginal bacteria or an infection. Reduced estrogen levels after menopause and some skin disorders can also cause vaginitis. The most common types of vaginitis are: Bacterial vaginosis, which results from a change of the normal bacteria found in your vagina to overgrowth of other organisms Yeast infections, which are usually caused by a naturally occurring fungus called Candida albicans Trichomoniasis, which is caused by a parasite and is commonly transmitted by sexual intercourse Treatment depends on ....

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    Vaginal fistula

    Overview A vaginal fistula is an abnormal opening that connects your vagina to another organ, such as your bladder, colon or rectum. Your doctor might describe the condition as a hole in your vagina that allows stool or urine to pass through your vagina. Vaginal fistulas can develop as a result of an injury, a surgery, an infection or radiation treatment. Whatever the cause of your fistula, you may need to have it closed by a surgeon to restore normal function. There are several types of vaginal fistulas: Vesicovaginal fistula. Also called a bladder fistula, this opening occurs between your vagina ....

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    Vaginal cancer

    Overview Vaginal cancer Vaginal cancer is a rare cancer that occurs in your vagina — the muscular tube that connects your uterus with your outer genitals. Vaginal cancer most commonly occurs in the cells that line the surface of your vagina, which is sometimes called the birth canal. While several types of cancer can spread to your vagina from other places in your body, cancer that begins in your vagina (primary vaginal cancer) is rare. A diagnosis of early-stage vaginal cancer has the best chance for a cure. Vaginal cancer that spreads beyond the vagina is much more difficult to ....

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    Vaginal atrophy

    Overview Vaginal atrophy (atrophic vaginitis) is thinning, drying and inflammation of the vaginal walls due to your body having less estrogen. Vaginal atrophy occurs most often after menopause. For many women, vaginal atrophy not only makes intercourse painful, but also leads to distressing urinary symptoms. Because of the interconnected nature of the vaginal and urinary symptoms of this condition, experts agree that a more accurate term for vaginal atrophy and its accompanying symptoms is "genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM)." Simple, effective treatments for genitourinary syndrome of menopause — vaginal atrophy and its urinary symptoms — are available. Reduced estrogen levels ....

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    Vaginal agenesis

    Overview Vaginal agenesis (a-JEN-uh-sis) is a rare disorder that occurs when the vagina doesn't develop, and the womb (uterus) may only develop partially or not at all. This condition is present before birth, and may also be associated with kidney, heart or skeletal abnormalities. The condition is also known as mullerian aplasia or Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments are available. After treatment, you may be able to have a normal sex life. Women with a missing or partially missing uterus can't get pregnant. If you have healthy ovaries, however, it may be possible to have a baby ....

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